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COLUMN

The patterned brass shade on the Column table lamp creates a visually intriguing moiré effect. In this design, Amanda Taarup Betz uses metal and etching to transfer her paper filigree patterns to a more stable medium without losing their delicate character. The inspiration for the lamp came in part from historical styles, including Louis XIV’s Versailles Palace, the rococo era and the Alhambra fortress in Andalusia, whose lavish and exuberant expression and intricate detailing stand in stark contrast to today’s emphasis on the strictly functional. Aiming for a more meditative feel, Amanda Taarup Betz uses ornamentation and patterns to spark an emotional response and invite pause and reflection.

Order here: www.amandabetz.com

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Amanda Betz

b. 1975, Danish architect MAA

Amanda Betz graduated as an architect in 2005 after studies at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Architecture and The Experimental Studio, Dept. 8. She has received numerous grants, including a grant from Esther & Jep Finks Mindelegat in 2015 for an exhibition at Galleri Superobjekt in Copenhagen and several grants from the Danish Arts Foundation, most recently in 2015. In 2005 she was awarded the VOLA prize for best graduation project from the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Architecture. She has exhibited widely, including ‘Lys_Objekt’ at Galleri Superobjekt in Copenhagen in 2015 and ‘Crafting Space’ at DAC, Danish Architecture Centre and ‘Lake of Fire’ at Den Frie Centre of Contemporary Art, both in 2011. Her lampshade ’Shayk’ for Artecnica Inc. is on sale in the MoMA shop in New York and featured on the cover of the shop catalogue in April 2015. Her pendant lamp ‘Cassiopeia’ is in production by the Danish lamp maker Le Klint.

Amanda Betz’s creative process typically begins with paper that she folds, cuts and prints and with classic pencil sketches. Later, these paper sketches or prototypes are then translated to sturdier materials. She is particularly interested in the use of patterns, which she always approaches from a three-dimensional perspective. Her patterns never remain two-dimensional but take on a spatial character that turns the pattern into a three-dimensional object rather than mere surface ornamentation. She enjoys pushing the boundaries of her materials, especially paper, to achieve new experimental shapes. These early stages are often reflected in products that maintain some of the delicate and fragile expression of the initial paper drafts. The inspiration for her products often springs from the visual effects of patterns, light and shadow combined with studies of architecture and design history.

img o-atb-01/COLUMN 1
H: 80,8 cm, Dia: 13,4 cm
Brass
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img o-atb-02/COLUMN 2
H: 55,6 cm, Dia: 10,5 cm
Brass
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img o-atb-03/COLUMN 3
H: 55,6 cm, Dia: 10,5 cm
Brass and white on the inside
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